Outliers computer and innate ability

Chapter 3 Themes and Colors Key LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Outliers, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Outliers computer and innate ability

She was two and a half. So I always knew this child had a gift for words. She loved to be read to, she made up stories and songs and poems and plays; she invented her own mythologies; she composed endless letters to her beloved granny. But she did not read early.

She did not go to school, so this did not pose a problem for her or for anyone else. She was part of a group of kids whose sense of politeness dictated that they not make a big issue about reading or any other skill that one kid had and another kid lacked.

If they were playing a game and needed to read something, or making up a play and wanted to write Outliers computer and innate ability, they would just find a kid or an adult who could do it.

A few times I tried, while reading her a story, to run my finger under the words as I read them, or to point out the sounds that certain letters make. I began to notice that it was as though she was actually averse to focusing on the print on the page.

She memorized whole books, whole poems, but she did it by sound, not sight.

Outliers computer and innate ability

She drew from somewhere deep inside, her lines fluid, deft, intuitive. Although she had tried not to interfere, she could no longer contain the scientific certainty of her advanced degrees and her forty years of professional experience and her steady access to the best available data; in real anguish she burst out: And for Isabel that window occurred when she was about four years old!

I learned to read when I was four because I loved all those things. Isabel is terrified of them. She has no desire to be left alone with those stories.

Outliers computer and innate ability

She wants a grown-up to read them to her. It sort of wilted like a flower, in fact. Her voice got very soft. She no longer wanted to wait for an adult to have time to read to her; she needed to know what happened next, dragons or no dragons.

When she was fourteen she read War and Peace. When she was twenty she was the head writing tutor at her college. How did this happen? This is an important point. The cognitive processes which underlie literacy are complex beyond your wildest imagination; our scientific understanding of them is in its early infancy.

It happens all the time. We are embarrassing ourselves in the eyes of future generations with our claims that we can identify reading skills and disabilities with blurry patches of color on a functional MRI image. The science is just not there yet. In other words, we are embarrassing ourselves in the eyes of future generations with our claims that we can identify reading skills and disabilities with blurry patches of color on a functional MRI image.

But any Maori mother knows that children do not learn in a straight upward line but in a stair-step pattern. They leap forward, then plateau for a while, then leap forward again. Then suddenly they soar. You have to be there, providing warmth and stability, providing tools and resources, answering questions, telling stories, having meaningful adult conversations and doing meaningful adult work in their presence.

Any Cree parent knows that you can tell when a child is ready for something because he will begin to ask questions about it. Even in WEIRD societies, everybody knows that there is a normal range of several months during which a child will say her first words or take her first steps.

A child who walks at 10 months will not necessarily be more physically talented than a child who walks at 14 months, and pediatricians spend much of their day reassuring us of this and encouraging us not to compare our children to each other.

But as a child moves through the life cycle, from first steps and first words to toilet training to losing baby teeth to riding a bicycle to reaching puberty, the normal range of variation does not decrease — it increases.

Joan Tollifson's List of Recommended Books

A completely normal healthy girl may reach puberty at nine or at fifteen, a normal range of several years.Maria Konnikova on research that suggests innate abilities, rather than deliberate practice, are the primary factor in academic and athletic success.

Prof. Grant’s response. Original post in black, Grant’s comments in blue. An article by Adam Grant called Differences Between Men And Women Are Vastly Exaggerated is going viral, thanks in part to a share by Facebook exec Sheryl Sandberg.

Intelligence and aptitude. Aptitude and intelligence quotient are related, and in some ways differing views of human mental ability. Unlike the original idea of IQ, aptitude often refers to one of the many different characteristics which can be independent of each other, such as aptitude for military flight, air traffic control, or computer programming.

JOAN'S ANNOTATED RECOMMENDED READING LIST. This list of recommended authors and books is in no way intended to be a comprehensive, definitive or authoritative list of nondual or spiritual books. Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers has become fairly popular for the view that reaching “world wide elite” status in any field requires around 10, hours of practice, but the book is more than this feelthefish.com book discusses various “outliers”, people who are outside the normal range of talent or success.

The book is also about re-evaluating what causes success. I would guess the progressive paradox of intelligence being nurture not nature is the strong linking of intelligence, education, and morality in their world view.

Contra Grant On Exaggerated Differences | Slate Star Codex